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Biography

Marijo Swick is a London artist with a lifelong interest in genetics; the majority of her work has revolved around the ideas of faith and science, particularly creation and creation myth. She works in a mixed media style incorporating found objects, digital and traditional painting, drawing, and writing. She has exhibited across Ontario and in the U.S., and most recently has had a solo exhibition in British Columbia. In 2007 she created a painting for The Centre of Applied Genomics in Toronto and in 2011 a painting commissioned by the City of London for the International Epigenetics Conference “EpigeneticsEh!” held in London in May. More of her work can be seen at www.marjoswick.com.

Relying heavily on dense patterns and layers, her work is built up slowly like a personal history, to be revealed with an equal commitment to patience in both meaning and physical structure. She creates work that needs to be unraveled and contemplated by the viewer, creating a personal experience.

About The Double Helix Café

This is an art piece examining our consumer culture, ethics and the science of genetics. In our fast-paced culture where everything is for sale, the idea of being able to order up a child as easlily as a latté really appealed to me. As a societal group, we largely misunderstand genetics and the ramifications it will have (and indeed has had) on our society. The rather simplistic view we have for such a complex subject, is very interesting. For this installation, my goal was to create something that had an interactive component to it, involving current web technologies and modern advertising using QR codes. Our consumer culture has overtaken the original applicaton of the internet and is now more about commerce than research. I wanted to integrate these things into one piece.

The Café idea has been with me for a long time now. I have been developing (and letting ideas simmer in the background) for about five years. Just how to present it though, while keeping that menu board idea was the major sticking point.